Rock Carvings

Rock Carvings

Two large areas of rock carvings have so far been registered in the Tromsø area. They have been partially developed so they are easily accessible to the public.

Dating rock art is the subject of debate, but it is normally linked to the sea level during certain periods or the type of engravings.

Only a few of the rock carvings in the Tromsø have been repainted. Consequently, we recommend using a strong torch so you get a better appreciation of the rock carvings. Shine the light to one side close up against the rock. This will also enable you to see the contours of carvings that are not painted.

 

Rock Carvings

Skavberget (Hella) on the island of Kvaløya has three vertical areas. One of the fields (the youngest) is easily accessible, while the other two are located on private property that is fenced and locked. The oldest area, which is at the top, is believed to date from around 7000 BC, while the youngest field, which is also more accessible, is from about 2600 BC. As this rock art is on vertical rock faces, it is also visible in the winter.
Read more about the rock carving at Skavberget in Wikipedia (only in Norwegian)

There is also prehistoric rock at Tennes in Balsfjord. There are two large areas of rock carvings here located in several fields, which have been dated to between 600 and 2500 BC. Both areas are situated near the historic Tennes Church and have been developed for visitors, including wheelchair users. The fields are located on sloping terrain and are therefore not particularly visitor friendly in the winter.
Read more about the rock carvings at Tennes in Wikipedia.

 

Visit the Rock Carvings at Tennes.

Rock Carvings